LinkedIn Wants To Help Know Your Profession’s Earning Potential

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We all know LinkedIn as the professionals network where you add your ā€œCVā€ of sorts and connect with people in your profession. The company was bought recently by Microsoft for a lot of money and since then, they have been making forward thinking moves like bots and a visual overhaul. Anyway, LinkedIn is also used by people to look for jobs and one of the biggest gripes about that is that you may have no idea what is your earning potential if you get it.

Now, LinkedIn wants to rectify all that with what they call LinkedIn Salary. It is rather difficult to know how much people in your profession are paid since it is usually a secret between the employer and employee and the company wants to rectify all that.

LinkedIn wants to tap on its huge user base of over 460 million users to give insights about how much they are paid in their respective fields. If you are concerned about your salary being exposed to the public, LinkedIn has assured everybody that the figure you input will be encrypted and kept private.

According to LinkedIn, LinkedIn Salary will help you:

  • see which industries pay the most for the same job.
  • know what salary you can expect to get based on current and future experience on the field.
  • see the top paying locations in the country.
  • understand which educational requirements matter which would help you focus on what you should get.
  • understand how company size affects pay.
  • see salaries for the top companies.

LinkedIn Premium members will have access to LinkedIn Salary without the need to contribute the salary information like the regular users and also have access to salary intel when they are looking for jobs.

This new feature is available on desktop and mobile web in the US, UK and Canada currently and the company plans to roll it out to all users next year. This will be an incredibly useful feature from the company and will definitely help you plan your career path if the data obtained by LinkedIn is accurate enough.

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